Our Research

NPM research solves real world challenges facing Māori. We do so in Māori-determined and inspired ways engendering sustainable relationships that grow the mana (respect and regard) and mauri (life essence) of the world we inhabit.

The excellence and expertise of the Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga researcher network is organised by four Te Ao Māori knowledge and excellence clusters or Pae. Pae are where our researchers rise with Te Ao Māori knowledge, tools and expertise to build a secure and prosperous future for Māori and Aotearoa New Zealand. Pae are purposefully expansive and inclusive, supporting transdisciplinary teams and approaches. Our 2021-2024 programme of work will look to the far future to assure flourishing Māori futures for generations to come. With Māori intended as the primary beneficiaries of our research, our programme will reinforce the firmly established foundations of mātauranga Māori through sound research attuned to the lived experience of Māori.

Four Pātai or critical systems-oriented questions generate transformative interventions and policy advice for stakeholders and next users. All of our research will contribute mātauranga-informed theories, models and evidenced solutions in response to our Pātai. Our Pātai serve to integrate and energise our programme and Pae to synthesize our research for next stage impact and outcomes.

  • COVID project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed

     

    Hoki atu ki tōu maunga kia purea ai e koe ki ngā hau o Tāwhirimātea – Return to your mountain to be cleansed by the winds of Tāwhirimātea

  • COVID project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed

    Māori are facing many challenges in their work experiences, especially during Covid-19. This research seeks to understand the unique cultural strategies that employees engage in that make these challenges more bearable.

  • Scoping project

    Project commenced:

    This study will explore how comparative views of “home” relate to concepts such as identity, whakapapa, and hauora and how these concepts thereby impact service utilisation and uptake in two areas (one rural and one urban). The research seeks to ask

    How do urban and rural Māori conceptualise “home” and do these ideas of home differ across generations?
    Do perceptions of home affect decisions to access services (education, health, financial, etc.?). If so, how?
    How can services be improved to incorporate these views / perceptions of home?

  • COVID project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed
    The COVID-19 pandemic forced the closure of Whakarewarewa Village Tours. The hapū of Whakarewarewa resolved to re-open the village in December 2020 however, the decimated context of the tourism industry, change of attention to a domestic market and the apprehension of the whānau to the opening of the village to tourists requires a thorough investigation and reconsideration of what is on offer for tourists in the village.
     
  • COVID project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed

    Research on the impact of COVID-19 on Māori tends to highlight its negative outcomes. This strengths-based research project examines improvements in Māori wellbeing that occurred as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic

  • COVID project

    Project commenced:
    Project completed

    New research analyses the mental, relational, psychological, and spiritual wellbeing of over 3000 Māori during and post-lockdown through Te Rangahau o Te Tuakiri Māori me Ngā Waiaro ā-Pūtea | The Māori Identity and Financial Attitudes Study (MIFAS).

  • Scoping project

    Project commenced:

    The guiding research question for this project are:

    1) How has Tuurangawaewae Marae fostered community mauri ora (wellbeing) within Waikato and in Te Ao Maaori more broadly?

    2) What role has Tuurangawaewae Marae played as both a repository and a place of action for te Reo me ngaa Tikanga in Waikato and in Aotearoa-New Zealand?

    3) What are the factors underpinning Tuurangawaewae Marae’s endurance as a centre for Maaori political action and manaakitanga (caring for community) both nationally and for Waikato whaanau

  • Scoping project

    Project commenced:

    The guiding research question for this project are:

    1) How has Tuurangawaewae Marae fostered community mauri ora (wellbeing) within Waikato and in Te Ao Maaori more broadly?

    2) What role has Tuurangawaewae Marae played as both a repository and a place of action for te Reo me ngaa Tikanga in Waikato and in Aotearoa-New Zealand?

    3) What are the factors underpinning Tuurangawaewae Marae’s endurance as a centre for Maaori political action and manaakitanga (caring for community) both nationally and for Waikato whaanau

  • Scoping project

    Project commenced:

    The guiding research question for this project are:

    1) How has Tuurangawaewae Marae fostered community mauri ora (wellbeing) within Waikato and in Te Ao Maaori more broadly?

    2) What role has Tuurangawaewae Marae played as both a repository and a place of action for te Reo me ngaa Tikanga in Waikato and in Aotearoa-New Zealand?

    3) What are the factors underpinning Tuurangawaewae Marae’s endurance as a centre for Maaori political action and manaakitanga (caring for community) both nationally and for Waikato whaanau

  • Scoping project

    Project commenced:

    We have identified a set of questions relating to Māori restorative justice in the Aotearoa Justice system and its effectiveness for Māori:

    What are the barriers Māori face when they participate in restorative justice as it stands?
    What can we learn from the traditional ways of resolving conflict that could minimise these barriers?

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