Seminars

Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 18:30 to 21:30

Starting in April 2016, thousands of people, led by Standing Rock Sioux Tribal members, gathered at camps to stop the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), creating the #NoDAPL movement. The movement temporarily blocked pipeline construction, though the Trump administration in 2017 reversed this decision, permitting DAPL's construction. #NoDAPL has mobilised Indigenous peoples and allies everywhere through the philosophy of "Mni Wiconi" or "Water is Life."

Thursday, August 25, 2016 - 12:30

On Wednesday 26th August and in the sixth of Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga’s (NPM) Horizons of Insight Seminars for 2015, Professor Helen Moewaka Barnes, presented a professorial lecture on Māori and Research Advancement and Managing with the Minimum.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 12:30

On Wednesday 29th July, Aneta Morgan (Te Arawa) presented the results of their research project, Taunakitia Te Marae: Marae as Centres of Excellence - a Te Arawa Perspective, whose aim was to identify and share best practice and aspirations in marae development across Te Arawa marae.

Friday, June 24, 2016 - 12:30 to 13:30

In the fourth of our Horizons of Insight seminars for 2015, and as part of our celebration of Matariki 2015, Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) presents Insights from the Maramataka & Science, with Professor Mike Walker and Dr Pauline Harris.

Wednesday, May 27, 2015 - 12:30 to 13:30
Tānenuiarangi (Wharenui), Waipapa Marae
16 Wynyard Street
University of Auckland
Auckland
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 12:30 to 13:30
Tānenuiarangi (Wharenui), Waipapa Marae
16 Wynyard Street
University of Auckland
Auckland
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 12:30
Tānenuiarangi (Wharenui), Waipapa Marae 
16 Wynyard Street 
University of Auckland 
Auckland 
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 14:00
Tānenuiarangi (Wharenui), Waipapa Marae
16 Wynyard Street
University of Auckland
Auckland

Māori are more likely to be assessed and treated by a health practitioner trained within a western cultural system that pays little attention to Māori worldviews and continue to experience misdiagnosis, non-voluntary admissions, inappropriate psychometric testing, high suicide rates, limited choices, differences in medication regimes and poorer treatment outcomes.

For many years indigenous knowledge has been considered incompatible with western science, mainly due to the differences in knowledge inquiry and transfer, as well as more fundamental beliefs about the inseparable nature of material and non-material aspects of the universe held by the former. Increasingly however, commonalities between the two are being recognised. Both scientists and indigenous knowledge holders, and in particular practitioners, are beginning to work with each other.

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