Seminars

Wednesday, May 27, 2015 - 12:30 to 13:30
Tānenuiarangi (Wharenui), Waipapa Marae
16 Wynyard Street
University of Auckland
Auckland
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 12:30 to 13:30
Tānenuiarangi (Wharenui), Waipapa Marae
16 Wynyard Street
University of Auckland
Auckland
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 12:30
Tānenuiarangi (Wharenui), Waipapa Marae 
16 Wynyard Street 
University of Auckland 
Auckland 
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 14:00
Tānenuiarangi (Wharenui), Waipapa Marae
16 Wynyard Street
University of Auckland
Auckland

Māori are more likely to be assessed and treated by a health practitioner trained within a western cultural system that pays little attention to Māori worldviews and continue to experience misdiagnosis, non-voluntary admissions, inappropriate psychometric testing, high suicide rates, limited choices, differences in medication regimes and poorer treatment outcomes.

For many years indigenous knowledge has been considered incompatible with western science, mainly due to the differences in knowledge inquiry and transfer, as well as more fundamental beliefs about the inseparable nature of material and non-material aspects of the universe held by the former. Increasingly however, commonalities between the two are being recognised. Both scientists and indigenous knowledge holders, and in particular practitioners, are beginning to work with each other.

Some economists argue for diversity in the way collective resources are managed rather than one having an unquestioning faith in leaving things to the market. Our team supports this thinking and look at how ethics and Māori knowledge can be used equally alongside economics in managing collective Māori assets. We argue that simple measures of collective well-being used alongside mainstream economics are robust enough to help us make collective decisions. The team is developing a Māori knowledge and ethics based decision-making framework for collective assets.

Almost 30 years ago, Jeffrey Sissons, noted historian, proposed two major types of histories principally relating to northern tribal region of New Zealand: (1) founding and (2) conquest. Founding traditions ‘concern marriage, birth and residence; they establish relations between hapū [kin groups] with respect to land’, he wrote (1988, p.200). Certainly this description may apply elsewhere in Aotearoa. There is another dimension of founding narratives that we want to talk about: the voyaging waka. These kōrero (stories) concern entrepreneurial leadership, discovery and expansion.

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga is delighted to announce that our first Horizons of insight seminar for 2014 is taking place next week. By our own Senior Research Fellow - Research Performance Dr Marilyn Tangi Ina McPherson When: Wednesday 26th March 2014 Where: Wharekai, Waipapa Marae, University of Auckland Time: 2-3 PM 

This research is a retrospective auto ethnographical account detailing the life history of my son Jonathon Kyle te Rau Aroha Brewin, born 10/10/75 and died 21/7/85. This is a story full of the many concepts related to happiness, joy, love and deep, deep sadness.

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